Saturday, June 19, 2010

Drug Testing Only for the Poor?

Here is my letter to Sen. Orrin Hatch in response to his proposal to test welfare recipients for drug use:

Mr. Hatch,

I see in the news that you propose that recipients of government assistance be required to take drug tests. I think you have a good idea, but there are at a few issues that arise from your proposal. First, consider the state of the food supply. The organization and structure of the food supply has a very strong bias towards efficiency over quality. This is evidenced by by films such as "Food, Inc." See link here, http://www.foodincmovie.com/. The movie paints a sordid picture of a food industry bent on efficiency and world domination rather than customer health.

Providing a marketplace that promotes organic, sustainable, GMO-free food, will give people the nutrition they need to make informed decisions about whether or not to take drugs. With proper nutrition, people are less prone to the suggestion that the use of illicit drugs are appropriate under any circumstance. And what about the legal drugs and alcohol? Shouldn't they also be considered when considering the fitness of any recipient of government assistance?

Since farmers receive large amounts of government assistance, especially the large corporations like ADM and Monsanto, they too, should be required to take drug tests. This idea that only the lowest levels of the social strata are the only people who might be inclined to take drugs is a farce at best. it is well documented that drug use is prevalent at all levels of social status and income.

Since we're on the subject, anyone who takes a government loan, grant or other form of financial assistance should be required to take a drug test. Consider the executives at GM, Goldman Sachs and Citigroup to be included. Lets call what is fair, fair. I agree with your idea as long as it is applied equally to *everyone* who gets government aid.

I hope you consider amending your proposals to reflect the ideas in this letter.

Thank you.

Scott Dunn
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